The Sheep Sanctuary At Cameron Highlands

Sheep in Cameron Highlands? For the first time in many years, visitors to Cameron Highlands can now see sheep up close and personal at The Sheep Sanctuary in Cameron Highlands.

Tickets are not expensive but how does this new attraction compare to the current line-up of existing attractions?

Here’s our honest review of The Sheep Sanctuary At Cameron Highlands.

Table Of Contents:

What Is The Sheep Sanctuary At Cameron Highlands?

The brainchild of a daring entrepreneur who was inspired by sheep farms in Taiwan:

The Sheep Sanctuary in Cameron Highlands is about 3 years old at this point (it opened in 2019). It’s not a full-scale sheep farm or a vast field, but consists mainly of an on-site cafe, a sheep pen and a small pasture.

Signboard In Front Of The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Signboard In Front Of The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Here, visitors are free to pet, feed or take photos with the sheep. There’s no time limit to how long you can stay during your visit.

There are roughly 20 sheep at The Sheep Sanctuary. The sheep are imported from Australia although a few might have been born here.

A Sheep Trying To Get Attention From Passerbys At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
A Sheep Trying To Get Attention From Passerbys At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

When To Visit The Sheep Sanctuary At Cameron Highlands

We did not see any new-born lambs when we visited in August.

The Only Lamb We Saw At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
The Only Lamb We Saw At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

And because there’s no market for sheep wool in Malaysia, the main source of income is tourism.

When we went, the sheep looked like they were very much due for sheering. Apparently, this is only done once a year. We did see one sheep that already got its haircut.

A Shorn Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
A Shorn Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Tip: Maybe time your visit towards the end August to see them sheer the sheep

It was quite crowded during our visit (11am to 12pm on a Friday) so we suggest going early before the crowd builds up.

Crowds Concentrating At The Sheep Pens In The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Crowds Concentrating At The Sheep Pens In The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Opening Hours: 9am to 5:30pm

However, the queue was gone when we left the place somewhere between 12 to 12:30pm. So maybe you could time your visit during lunch time too if you can’t afford to go on a weekday.

Queue At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Queue At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Because we cannot imagine how much more packed The Sheep Sanctuary would be during a public holiday or weekend.

The whole experience would be a lot more enjoyable with less people – of course, this applies to other attractions in Cameron Highlands too.

How Are The Sheep Cared For?

We’re not experts on sheep but their faces and hooves looked clean to us. Some sheep looked overweight but that could be all the wool.

Kid Getting Squemish About Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Kid Getting Squemish About Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

There were many sheep that were simply uninterested in food offered to them. Preferring to doze on the floor of the pens (we went at noon) instead.

Besides the food that visitors give them, the sheep get cut grass to eat too. The evidence is in their feed troughs and at a maintenance corner in the sheep pen.

Cut Grass Put Aside For The Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Cut Grass Put Aside For The Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

We hope that they do get let out into the tiny pasture at the end of the day but having seen sheep in New Zealand, it seemed like very little space for the sheep to wonder.

Although the pens are well-ventilated and clean. We did not spot any staff around at the time of our visit.

The Sheep Pen At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
The Sheep Pen At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Where Is The Sheep Sanctuary?

The Sheep Sanctuary is at Kea Farm Market. An area which sees possibly the heaviest traffic in Cameron Highlands.

So while you can go around in circles with your cark looking for a vacant car spot, there are 2 paid parking lots that are within walking distance from The Sheep Sanctuary.

The first of these two car parks is right beside Kea Farm Market. And costs RM7 per car per entry.

An alternative is the new CH Flora car park behind Kea Farm Market. If you want to find it, key in “CH Flora car park” into the Waze app.

CH Flora Park Carpark Seen From The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
CH Flora Park Carpark Seen From The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

This car park operates by an automatic gate with limited payment methods – either via your credit card, debit card, or eWallet.

A few hours on a weekday will cost RM8 at this car park. But this car park does have toilets on site.

What Are The Facilities At The Sheep Sanctuary?

The Sheep Sanctuary has a ticket counter right at the front.

Ticket Counter In Front Of The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Ticket Counter In Front Of The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

And the queue snakes behind an old hotel building. The souvenir shop is right beside the entrance barrier for The Sheep Sanctuary.

The Souvenir Shop At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
The Souvenir Shop At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

There are steps and a sloped pathway going all the way down to the sheep pen.

The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands Is Highly Popular With Families
The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands Is Highly Popular With Families – Photo by Travelswithsun

But on the immediate left of the entrance barrier, there is a Puku café too (the main entrance to this café is practically next door to the ticket counter for The Sheep Sanctuary).

On Site Cafe At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
On Site Cafe At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Personally though, we would not fancy having an ice cream here since the sheep odors do waft up here.

However, we highly recommend the strawberry flavor if you want to try Puku ice cream (there’s another stall at Kea Farm Market).

As for toilets, we did not see any while we were at The Sheep Sanctuary and we suspect the toilets over at Cameron Square are cleaner too.

And if these count as facilities, there are vending machines at the sheep pen in The Sheep Sanctuary if you want to purchase more feed.

Visitors Purchasing More Feed From The Vending Machine At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
Visitors Purchasing More Feed From The Vending Machine At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Who Should Visit The Sheep Sanctuary?

Malaysians in particular, will find The Sheep Sanctuary unique because there are very few places in Malaysia where you can see a live sheep.

The Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands Are Docile Enough To Accept Food Straight From Your Hands
The Sheep At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands Are Docile Enough To Accept Food Straight From Your Hands – Photo by Travelswithsun

Furthermore, you can closely interact with the sheep at The Sheep Sanctuary since there are they are free roaming.

Kids will no doubt, find a visit to The Sheep Sanctuary eye opening and exciting. The sheep are very docile and tame too. But nevertheless, parents should always keep a watchful eye.

A Handsome Ram At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands
A Handsome Ram At The Sheep Sanctuary In Cameron Highlands – Photo by Travelswithsun

But all this said, if you don’t like animals (or kids running and screaming about) or long queues, it’s best you give this place a miss entirely.

Conclusion

While many tourist attractions in Cameron Highlands are duplicates of each other,The Sheep Sanctuary in Cameron Highlands offers something wholly unusual.

And that’s worth seeing once especially if you yourself or your kids have never seen sheep before. We think however, that the sheep are already well fed so feeding them is not necessary.

Related: CH Flora Park – Worth Checking Out Or Passing On?

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